The Anderson House was built by John E. Anderson (1847-1943) in 1878.  Anderson was a wealthy merchant who began his career as a clerk in the Roberts, Anderson and Chew dry goods store in the 1860s.  By the late 1870s, Anderson was wealthy enough to build this house, an Italianate mansion located just north of the Holly Springs Public School which was built a year after this house.

By the 1890s, Anderson was one of the richest people in Holly Springs, and had his hand in the founding of many local ventures, including the Federal Compress (1890) in 1890 and the Merchant and Farmer’s Bank in 1899.  By the early 1900s, at the age of 60, Anderson was the President of the Merchant and Farmers Bank.  Anderson lived to the age of 96, dying in 1943.

In 1944, Anderson’s children sold this house to Charles A. Miller (1876-1958), who lived here until 1956.  Dr. Edward B. Warren (1924-2016) bought the house from Miller and lived here until 1969, when he sold the house to the Stanley Mulliken family.  In 1987 the Anderson House was purchased by Perry and Beth Breithaupt, who have now lived here 30 years, longer than any family since the Andersons.

For a brief period in the 1870s, the Anderson House was a stop on the short-lived horse-drawn trolly, which came from the Square and went to the Depot.

The Anderson House is a two-story Italianate hip-roof frame house, with a front gable-on-hip roof ell and a two-bay hip roof supported by piers.  The front door has a transom and sidelights.  One of the highlights of the house are the great paired brackets found along the cornice line.    The house has been altered several times throughout the years, including in the 1920s when the house’s original hip-roof dormer windows were removed (see 1900 picture).

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